Biological & Optical Prevention (BOP) is a team of Trinity College Dublin students developing a product which will put an end to the spread of Healthcare Acquired Infections (HAIs) in Healthcare Facilities. The idea for BOP was conceived after a founder lost two family members to HAIs. This global issue affects 7/100 people in developed countries and 10/100 in developing countries.

HAIs occur when a patient enters a healthcare facility with one ailment and contracts a completely separate and unrelated disease. The HSE estimate that 60% of deaths in the Irish hospitals are attributed to HAIs, and the NHS have reporting that MRSA, a prevalent HAI, costs their systems £1 billion per year. We have concluded that the lack of any method of pathogen identification is catapulting the HAI contraction rate.

Pathogens move between patients on carriers, such as people or equipment. If a vulnerable patient comes into contact with a harmful pathogen and becomes ill, a broad “one treatment fits ...
Biological & Optical Prevention (BOP) is a team of Trinity College Dublin students developing a product which will put an end to the spread of Healthcare Acquired Infections (HAIs) in Healthcare Facilities. The idea for BOP was conceived after a founder lost two family members to HAIs. This global issue affects 7/100 people in developed countries and 10/100 in developing countries.

HAIs occur when a patient enters a healthcare facility with one ailment and contracts a completely separate and unrelated disease. The HSE estimate that 60% of deaths in the Irish hospitals are attributed to HAIs, and the NHS have reporting that MRSA, a prevalent HAI, costs their systems £1 billion per year. We have concluded that the lack of any method of pathogen identification is catapulting the HAI contraction rate.

Pathogens move between patients on carriers, such as people or equipment. If a vulnerable patient comes into contact with a harmful pathogen and becomes ill, a broad “one treatment fits all” methodology is applied (Sepsis Protocol). The patient is treated in a standardised fashion, an inefficient and costly approach. It can take up to 3 weeks for an illness to be diagnosed as a specific HAI. This means weeks without effective treatment for the patient and frustration for healthcare staff. Without identifying the pathogen healthcare workers cannot offer specific treatment for a specific pathogen to give their patients a fighting chance.

Our solution encompasses a biological and technological solution which introduces a standardised, guaranteed method of disinfection. The biological solution, which comes in the form of chemical which has been developed in-house, is combined with disinfectant and applied to a surface. When it makes contact with a surface there is a visual indication, in the form of a colour change, of pathogens/external bodies present. Upon successful eradication, the surface returns to its previous state. Image sensors are able to observe this colour change and conduct analysis of the pathogens present on a surface.

This data is fed to a system and relevant healthcare workers are informed of potential dangers and threats to their facility. This allows healthcare workers to adopt best practices to prevent the spread of dangerous pathogens and can also aid in the crucial diagnosis of a patient who has contracted a HAI. This solution has the potential to disrupt Healthcare Facilities practices, saving time, money and most importantly, lives.
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Employees

Sinead McAleer
Admin
Sinead McAleer CTO I am a 2nd year Computer Science & Business student at Trinity College Dublin. I have a passion for entrepreneurship and digital technology.