Casa da Tia brings together the descendants of Tia Ciata, considered the matriarch of samba in Rio de Janeiro.

The organization develops several cultural activities in Rio de Janeiro and participates in various networks in the city. Currently, two programs have been carried out: “Our Identity”, which aims at promoting the roots of samba through events such as "Batuke de Ciata” and “Samba da Cabaça”. “Batuke de Ciata” is a street festival that occurs a week before Carnival in Rio de Janeiro where percussion is played mostly by black women. “Samba da Cabaça” aims at both valorizing traditional musicians and supporting new ones. “Cabaça [gourd] in the Yorubá cosmogony means the essence of life and through it one may praise ancestry and friendship. Another program developed is “Multiplying Knowledge”: a valorization of the African-Brazilian culture through activities such as a cultural tour in “Little Africa”, following the steps of Tia Ciata (matriarch of ...
Casa da Tia brings together the descendants of Tia Ciata, considered the matriarch of samba in Rio de Janeiro.

The organization develops several cultural activities in Rio de Janeiro and participates in various networks in the city. Currently, two programs have been carried out: “Our Identity”, which aims at promoting the roots of samba through events such as "Batuke de Ciata” and “Samba da Cabaça”. “Batuke de Ciata” is a street festival that occurs a week before Carnival in Rio de Janeiro where percussion is played mostly by black women. “Samba da Cabaça” aims at both valorizing traditional musicians and supporting new ones. “Cabaça [gourd] in the Yorubá cosmogony means the essence of life and through it one may praise ancestry and friendship. Another program developed is “Multiplying Knowledge”: a valorization of the African-Brazilian culture through activities such as a cultural tour in “Little Africa”, following the steps of Tia Ciata (matriarch of samba).

The route is surrounded by traditions, achievements, religiosity and delicacies. Workshops on vocal techniques, drums, capoeira and “jongo” are also offered by the program. We also reinforce local skills of 140 black women and young local practitioners from the Port area of Rio de Janeiro (a zone traditionally known as “Little Africa”) through creative workshops on graphic design, macramé techniques, afro hair braiding and audiovisual documentary production;
we reinforce the role of African-Brazilian organizations in the development and implementation of cultural policies. We also work closely with other grassroots organizations, discussing strategies, tools and opportunities to explore the synergy between tangible and intangible cultural heritage, cultural valuable areas and the cultural productive chain, as an engine for territorial development.

And, finally, we foster the recognition of the contribution of the African-Brazilian culture to the Brazilian society through workshops on drums, percussion, maculelê and jongo for 720 youngsters from Little Africa.
More information

Advisors

Alan Alves Brito
Admin
Alan Alves Brito Astrophysicist posso
Arianna Cortesi
Admin
Arianna Cortesi Astronomer