THE PROBLEM
Over the past forty years, investigative journalism has changed the face of our country. It has put criminals behind bars, removed corrupt politicians from office, and prompted the passage of new laws that protect countless Americans. But from 1984-2010, the amount of public service reporting in the U.S. declined an estimated 43% -- and that’s nationally. In many small and medium sized markets, there is now no investigative journalism at all. Across the country, it is dying.

News outlets are increasingly cutting back because they’ve “determined” that investigative journalism takes a lot of time and effort, and doesn’t pay for itself. As a result, news deserts, areas where there are literally no investigative reporters left, are cropping up across the country. The minimal reporting that is done often comes from outsiders, who can’t provide strong local coverage because they aren’t part of the community. And the field’s future is similarly bleak; universities currently pr...
THE PROBLEM
Over the past forty years, investigative journalism has changed the face of our country. It has put criminals behind bars, removed corrupt politicians from office, and prompted the passage of new laws that protect countless Americans. But from 1984-2010, the amount of public service reporting in the U.S. declined an estimated 43% -- and that’s nationally. In many small and medium sized markets, there is now no investigative journalism at all. Across the country, it is dying.

News outlets are increasingly cutting back because they’ve “determined” that investigative journalism takes a lot of time and effort, and doesn’t pay for itself. As a result, news deserts, areas where there are literally no investigative reporters left, are cropping up across the country. The minimal reporting that is done often comes from outsiders, who can’t provide strong local coverage because they aren’t part of the community. And the field’s future is similarly bleak; universities currently provide little training in investigative reporting.

THE SOLUTION
The Community Tribune: empowering the country’s brightest young minds to shine a light on its darkest problems.

· Pioneering a new, multi-pronged business model that will make investigative journalism sustainable and scalable for the first time
· Bringing critical reporting to “news deserts” with the greatest need
· Sourcing and distributing stories through individuals that are part of -- and have a stake in -- the community, leading to better reporting and maximum impact
· Transforming a group of intelligent, passionate students into the next generation of great reporters, with the skills and drive to produce public service journalism around the world for years to come

PRODUCT DESCRIPTION
CT pinpoints news deserts, identifies and recruits the most capable students within them that have an interest in journalism, and provides the students with everything they need to do investigative journalism about those communities while still in school. The support includes experienced reporters to supervise the projects, training, story leads, fact-checking, legal support, funding, a publication platform, and more. Once stories are produced, they are published by a media partner and on CT’s website, with an aggressive advertising and subscription strategy. Leaders in the community are also engaged to help distribute stories within their circles.
More information

Advisors

Bill Lord
Admin
David Herzog
Admin
David Herzog Educator and investigative journalist
Josh Luger
Admin
Tracy Breton
Admin