Cystoview was created by two urologists who were frustrated with the outdated nature of cystoscopy, the procedure where urologists visualize the inside of the bladder. Currently, urologists only have two choices when performing cystoscopy: either use a thick cord to connect to a large, bulky tower, or bring one’s eye directly up to the scope, which is located uncomfortably between the patient’s legs. The former is typically done in the operating room (OR), but is unwieldy and hindered by proprietary technology. The latter is typically portable and is done at patient bedside or in the office, but is non-ergonomic and allows only one person to visualize the image. Both introduce non-sterile elements into a sterile field and both make it unfeasible to apply image processing to the procedure.

Our company will solve these problems with a straightforward and simple solution: a wireless camera which attaches to the end of existing cystoscopes. This will allow urologists to transmit cyst...
Cystoview was created by two urologists who were frustrated with the outdated nature of cystoscopy, the procedure where urologists visualize the inside of the bladder. Currently, urologists only have two choices when performing cystoscopy: either use a thick cord to connect to a large, bulky tower, or bring one’s eye directly up to the scope, which is located uncomfortably between the patient’s legs. The former is typically done in the operating room (OR), but is unwieldy and hindered by proprietary technology. The latter is typically portable and is done at patient bedside or in the office, but is non-ergonomic and allows only one person to visualize the image. Both introduce non-sterile elements into a sterile field and both make it unfeasible to apply image processing to the procedure.

Our company will solve these problems with a straightforward and simple solution: a wireless camera which attaches to the end of existing cystoscopes. This will allow urologists to transmit cystoscopic images to any phone, tablet, laptop, or wireless- equipped monitor, freeing urologists from the thick wires and bulky towers of current OR video cystoscopy. At the same time, urologists performing cystoscopy at bedside will enjoy vastly improved ergonomics, be able to share the view with assistants, and be able to save their images for later review.

Most importantly, Cystoview will bring modern advances in image processing to bear on this ubiquitous urologic procedure. Via Cystoview, urologists will be able to easily link to electronic health records, have access to previous cystoscopy recordings, and be able to share the images with their patients. Cystoview has also developed ground-breaking software to stitch cystoscopy videos into panoramic maps of the bladder, which has never before been done. Through these images, urologists will be able to, for the first time, follow both the characteristics and surrounding architecture of bladder lesions over time and improving patient care and communication.

Amazingly, cystoview manages to do all of at an extremely affordable cost. Currently, digital cystoscopes are only available in Europe, and cost approximately $10,000 per scope. They still containlarge, thick wires, and they still connect to proprietary towers. Urologists looking to switch to them must throw away tens of thousands of dollars of older hardware. Cystoview not only avoids these limitations, but will also allow urologists to keep their existing scopes.
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