We are developing a novel intracranial shunt to treat hydrocephalus in animals. We are first trying to perfect our prototype on canines and then hope to branch out to other animals. Instead of using a catheter to drain the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) into the chest or abdomen like the models used today our shunt will drain the CSF from the lateral ventricle into the subarachnoid space. The procedure that will be used to implant the device will be easier and faster according to our veterinary partner who is the department head of neurosurgery at Mississippi State's veterinarian school. The device itself will be cheaper than the shunts available on the market today and because the procedure will be completed more quickly it is our hope that the price of the operation will be significantly decreased making it more affordable, therefore increasing the number of procedures done per year....
We are developing a novel intracranial shunt to treat hydrocephalus in animals. We are first trying to perfect our prototype on canines and then hope to branch out to other animals. Instead of using a catheter to drain the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) into the chest or abdomen like the models used today our shunt will drain the CSF from the lateral ventricle into the subarachnoid space. The procedure that will be used to implant the device will be easier and faster according to our veterinary partner who is the department head of neurosurgery at Mississippi State's veterinarian school. The device itself will be cheaper than the shunts available on the market today and because the procedure will be completed more quickly it is our hope that the price of the operation will be significantly decreased making it more affordable, therefore increasing the number of procedures done per year.
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