In February of 2021, the San Diego County Board of Supervisors unanimously voted to declare the Tijuana River Valley a public health crisis because of excessive pollution that’s poisoning the border region’s land, water, and residents. While this pollution is often easily visible in the form of neon-colored water, sewage in the streets, or large piles of garbage, it’s difficult for individuals to find the proper municipal authorities to report to, especially if those individuals are challenged by time and language limitations. To date, the most meaningful efforts to remediate serious environmental risks have been organized by non-governmental environmental organizations, yet these groups struggle to gather centralized data on incidents of pollution. The fronTERRA (frontera = border in Spanish, TERRA = Earth in Latin) app will facilitate reporting to the proper authorities and will aggregate open-source data on incidents of pollution for use by environmental groups, reporters, and...
In February of 2021, the San Diego County Board of Supervisors unanimously voted to declare the Tijuana River Valley a public health crisis because of excessive pollution that’s poisoning the border region’s land, water, and residents. While this pollution is often easily visible in the form of neon-colored water, sewage in the streets, or large piles of garbage, it’s difficult for individuals to find the proper municipal authorities to report to, especially if those individuals are challenged by time and language limitations. To date, the most meaningful efforts to remediate serious environmental risks have been organized by non-governmental environmental organizations, yet these groups struggle to gather centralized data on incidents of pollution. The fronTERRA (frontera = border in Spanish, TERRA = Earth in Latin) app will facilitate reporting to the proper authorities and will aggregate open-source data on incidents of pollution for use by environmental groups, reporters, and academic researchers who seek to pressure corporations and municipal authorities to invest in remediation. By providing a simple, bilingual, and anonymous way to report pollution, residents of the San Diego—Tijuana bioregion will be empowered and motivated to address the pollution around them by reporting incidents that need remediation. The fronTERRA app will also serve local municipalities by bringing environmental hazards to their attention before remediation efforts become costly or unmanageable. People can report pollution by taking a photo of the incident, categorizing the type of pollution (ie. oily sheen, sewage, garbage pile, etc.), and attaching GPS coordinates. This data will be color-coded by type of pollution and presented on an open-source map of the San Diego—Tijuana bioregion in order to display pollution hotspots. Reports will also be made downloadable to the public in a csv format to facilitate research, journalism, policy development, and more.
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Employees

Molly Ryan
Admin
Molly Ryan Community Outreach I’m a second-year ESYS major at UCSD with a passion for sustainability and remediation.
Austin Serif
Admin
Austin Serif