The Liter of Light redesigns solar lighting for the developing world: its simple, two-step technology creates local jobs, teaches green skills, and empowers energy-poor communities. Rather than depending on imported, patented, and expensive technologies, this grassroots green lighting movement believes that anyone can become a solar engineer.

Using parts that sourced within and around the community, like plastic bottles, PVC pipes, and recycled batteries, Liter of Light teaches communities how to build solar reading lamps, mobile charging systems, and street lights by hand. They increase communities’ self- reliance by integrating a livelihood model with the capacity to quickly assemble lights. Their technologies are built and assembled at 1/3 of the cost of other products on the market, including about 20% which is retained as a livelihood, with all output produced given to the community.

Liter of Light focuses its work with womens’ cooperatives since they are the ones who make m...
The Liter of Light redesigns solar lighting for the developing world: its simple, two-step technology creates local jobs, teaches green skills, and empowers energy-poor communities. Rather than depending on imported, patented, and expensive technologies, this grassroots green lighting movement believes that anyone can become a solar engineer.

Using parts that sourced within and around the community, like plastic bottles, PVC pipes, and recycled batteries, Liter of Light teaches communities how to build solar reading lamps, mobile charging systems, and street lights by hand. They increase communities’ self- reliance by integrating a livelihood model with the capacity to quickly assemble lights. Their technologies are built and assembled at 1/3 of the cost of other products on the market, including about 20% which is retained as a livelihood, with all output produced given to the community.

Liter of Light focuses its work with womens’ cooperatives since they are the ones who make most of the buying decisions for their families. Through their solar lighting training, they have become micro-entrepreneurs and trainers helping to teach communities how to assemble the lamps. They know where the needs of the community are. In participating in training and building the lights, they are no longer recipients of outside technologies but empowered to feel ownership over the technologies and how to use them.

During the last year, when almost 60% of NGOs in the Philippines have had to stop operations due to the pandemic, Liter of Light thought of new ways to continue with its work.

In July 2020, it launched the "Light It Forward" campaign (www.lightitforward.ph), inviting corporate volunteers, businesses, and ordinary citizens to bring light and hope to families without electricity by building simple solar lights from the safety of home.

Since launch, the completely digital campaign has inspired over 3,000 Filipinos into action, 500 government officials have signed on to the challenge, and they’ve reached over 30 million viewers through partnerships with online platforms, influencers, and corporate sponsors. Most importantly, they've empowered 15,000 families (or an estimated 75,000 people) with our hand-built solar lights.

To inspire more young people and reinvigorate efforts to fight energy poverty, we have assembled some of the largest solar-powered art installations in Asia using lights built during the challenge.
More information

Employees

Illac Diaz
Admin
Illac Diaz CEO I am social entrepreneur working to empower communities in the Philippines and around the world through pioneering technologies and art.