VenomAid is a young and impact-oriented medtech startup from the Technical University of Denmark. VenomAid develops affordable, easy-to-use, rapid diagnostics for envenomings, empowering even inexperienced health personnel to diagnose and perform administration of the correct antivenom treatment. When a sample (either blood or wound-swab) is applied to a test strip, the presence of specific toxins will cause a color change on a test line, detectable by the naked eye. This approach offers a rapid, robust, and cost-effective diagnostic tool for use by clinicians both at hospitals and on-site. Furthermore, in the case of snakebite envenoming, the test will allow diagnosis prior to symptom development, thereby greatly reducing the severity of the envenoming and saving up to USD 980 per patient, sparing both limbs and lives.

As a proof of business, VenomAid’s first product will be a diagnostic test capable of differentiating all medically relevant snake genera in Brazil. Snakebite in Br...
VenomAid is a young and impact-oriented medtech startup from the Technical University of Denmark. VenomAid develops affordable, easy-to-use, rapid diagnostics for envenomings, empowering even inexperienced health personnel to diagnose and perform administration of the correct antivenom treatment. When a sample (either blood or wound-swab) is applied to a test strip, the presence of specific toxins will cause a color change on a test line, detectable by the naked eye. This approach offers a rapid, robust, and cost-effective diagnostic tool for use by clinicians both at hospitals and on-site. Furthermore, in the case of snakebite envenoming, the test will allow diagnosis prior to symptom development, thereby greatly reducing the severity of the envenoming and saving up to USD 980 per patient, sparing both limbs and lives.

As a proof of business, VenomAid’s first product will be a diagnostic test capable of differentiating all medically relevant snake genera in Brazil. Snakebite in Brazil was chosen based on the large impact a novel functional diagnostic test would have on patient outcome, Brazil’s relatively undiverse snake fauna, and the team’s vast prior knowledge and experience in the area.

The most common method of diagnosing snakebites today is to await symptom development and form an opinion based on those symptoms. Such a syndromic approach can be supported by e.g. blood clotting tests, which are useful in assessing signs of coagulopathies but do not allow identification of the snake. The syndromic approach is relatively slow, delaying treatment and allowing the snake venom to exert its toxic effects for a longer time, resulting in mean hospital stays of 4.6 days. Several key opinion leaders within snakebite envenoming and the World Health Organization (WHO) are warranting the need for affordable, rapid, and user-friendly diagnostic devices for snakebite envenoming. This has resulted in the recent acceptance of snakebite as one of the most neglected tropical diseases by WHO, and snakebite is therefore prioritized in the UN SDG 3.3.5. As snakebites often exacerbate poverty, we are also addressing SDG 1.1 and 1.2.



In the future, we aim to facilitate a paradigm shift within management of envenomings and poisonings globally and to become leaders in affordable, easy-to-use, and robust toxin diagnostics addressing animal envenomings (snakes, scorpions, etc.) as well as poisonings (food intoxication, water contamination).
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Employees

Jonas Arnold Jürgensen
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Jonas Arnold Jürgensen CEO 🐍 Bringing snakebite diagnostics into the 21st Century • Co-founder & CEO at VenomAid Diagnostics