A Cargo Container’s Journey Through the Supply Chain

Almost all finished and semi-finished products are transported in shipping containers today. A cargo container’s journey requires multiple handoffs involving warehouses, container terminals, shipping lines, trucks, rail and logistics service providers as it moves through the supply chain towards its destination. Information regarding a cargo container’s journey from these parties may be provided through disparate channels (eg. web portals, EDI, e-mails, and even phone calls) to certain parties in the supply chain, which are then separately forwarded to other parties further down the supply chain. In many cases, gathering shipment information is cumbersome and not available in a timely manner or not available at all to certain parties.

Digitalising the Supply Chain

Recently, there has been an emergence of digital supply chain platforms that aim to provide cargo owners with ‘end-to-end visibility’ in the supply chain, all...
A Cargo Container’s Journey Through the Supply Chain

Almost all finished and semi-finished products are transported in shipping containers today. A cargo container’s journey requires multiple handoffs involving warehouses, container terminals, shipping lines, trucks, rail and logistics service providers as it moves through the supply chain towards its destination. Information regarding a cargo container’s journey from these parties may be provided through disparate channels (eg. web portals, EDI, e-mails, and even phone calls) to certain parties in the supply chain, which are then separately forwarded to other parties further down the supply chain. In many cases, gathering shipment information is cumbersome and not available in a timely manner or not available at all to certain parties.

Digitalising the Supply Chain

Recently, there has been an emergence of digital supply chain platforms that aim to provide cargo owners with ‘end-to-end visibility’ in the supply chain, allowing them to track-and-trace their cargo by drawing shipment information made available from supply chain service providers. Additionally, IoT-based solutions involving trackers installed in containers or the cargo can monitor location and sense certain physical events experienced by the shipment (eg. Temperature, shock). These solutions are only as good as the range of data they have access to, as well as the data’s quality and timeliness, but are nonetheless commonly found.

##Challenge brief - Rethinking Supply Chain Visibility##

a) Where are the remaining “black-holes” in supply chain visibility today? What technology and innovation can address these “black-holes”?
b) Apart from container visibility and tracking, what new supply chain management solutions can make use of our data? For e.g. How can we provide visibility into the container and follow the goods themselves?
c) What other solutions can be developed with our data that will be valuable in use cases beyond supply chain management?

Let us know what types of data will enable these new solutions, including their quality and timeliness criteria.
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Staff

Amandine BÉGEL
Admin
Amandine BÉGEL Startup Hunter @ZEBOX
Ashley Mak
Admin
Jason Wong
Admin
Jason Wong Digitization@CMA CGM Innovation & Digitization Seeker

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